Research themes: The brain at single cell resolution

Our research aims to unravel the basic biological mechanisms of neurobiology and brain disease and to pursue these novel findings to solve major medical problems. This work is defined by five forefront, multidisciplinary research lines, on which our different labs collaborate and interact:

The brain at single cell resolution

The brain is the most complex organ in our body. We are still to uncover all the different cell types (neuronal and glial subtypes) that exist in the brain and how these cells are changing as we age or when we undertake specific actions (eg sleep, learning, etc). Researchers in our center produced the first complete map of all the cells that reside in a living fruit fly brain, and mapped the changes that occur during ageing, while others have defined the types of glial support cells (astrocytes) at unprecedented resolution.

We are now pursuing questions that will address what are the cellular changes that occur during disease, ageing and behavior. We are also working on the next generation of technology to measure cellular function at much higher resolution and to maintain spatial information of the location of the cells in the brain.

 

Labs

STEIN AERTS LAB
Laboratory of computational biology

BART DE STROOPER LAB
Laboratory for the research of neurodegenerative diseases

JORIS DE WIT LAB
Laboratory of synapse biology

MATTHEW HOLT LAB
Laboratory of glia biology

SHA LIU LAB
Laboratory of Sleep and Synaptic Plasticity

SEBASTIAN MUNCK LAB
Light microscopy expertise unit

PIERRE VANDERHAEGHEN LAB
Stem cell and developmental neurobiology

PATRIK VERSTREKEN LAB
Laboratory of neuronal communication

THOMAS VOETS LAB
Laboratory of ion channel research

Selected publications

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